A Memory Stirred

A Memory Stirred

HMCS Esquimalt – 16 April 1945

Prepared by Gerry Madigan

https://www.madiganstories.com/a-memory-stirred/

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A Time to Remember

https://www.madiganstories.com/

… is dedicated to the memory of the men and women who served on Canada’s East Coast in Nova Scotia during the Second World War.

There are many remarkable stories, largely untold, that recount their service, sacrifice and place in our Country’s history.

Some are of tragic loss, and others of boundless courage, devotion to duty and of valour too.

Now some 70+ years later… it’s A Time To Remember.

In for a penny, In for a pound : The Adventures and Misadventures of a Wireless Operator in Bomber Command (1) — John Knifton

I haven’t written a book review before, but last week I was quite struck by this particular book, entitled “In for a penny, In for a pound : The Adventures and Misadventures of a Wireless Operator in Bomber Command” written by Howard Hewer. It is by no means a new book. My copy was published […]

via In for a penny, In for a pound : The Adventures and Misadventures of a Wireless Operator in Bomber Command (1) — John Knifton

May 3, 1915 The Red Poppy

May 3, 1915 The Red Poppy

Where the idea of the poppy came from…

Today in History

John McCrae was a physician and amateur poet from Guelph, Ontario. Following the outbreak of WWI, McCrae enlisted in the Canadian Expeditionary Force at the age of 41. He had the option of joining the medical corps based on his training and his age, but volunteered instead to join a fighting unit as gunner and medical officer. McCrae had previously served in the Boer War, this would be his second tour of duty in the Canadian military.

Red PoppyMcCrae fought in one of the most horrendous battles of WWI, the second battle of Ypres, in the Flanders region of Belgium. Imperial Germany launched one of the first chemical attacks in history, attacking the Canadian position with chlorine gas on April 22, 1915. The Canadian line was broken but quickly reformed, in near-constant fighting that lasted for over two weeks.

Dr. McCrae later wrote to his mother, describing the nightmare. “For seventeen…

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