Les frères Rousseau

Who remembers the Rousseau brothers?

Something I wrote on March 19, 2010 on Souvenirs de guerre, the French version of Lest We Forget.


Updated 9 March 2022

Emails from a relative

Hi there,

I wanted to thank you for the great page you have so kindly dedicated to my great uncles Philippe and Maurice Rousseau.

I grew up hearing their valiant stories which always remain with me.

Regarding the picture in which you originally believed to be Philippe (with his 2 sisters) was actually a soldier in Philippe’s division called Moffat (I have never seen the name spelled and I do not know much about him)

After Philippe was killed and the fighting died down, the rest of the platoon was captured including Mr. Moffat. He came by the family residence to tell the story of Philippe.

Interesting tidbit, Moffat and the rest of the platoon were moved to a prison camp in the mountains where they remained for quite some time. One of the German guards was looking for a skiing buddy and Moffat was his man. He spent a portion of his internment skiing. The German officer did say that if he tried to escape, he would be shot. Nevertheless, Mr. Moffat was able to tell our family of the heroism of Philippe.

The story I had been told was that Philippe’s battalion had been dropped at the wrong place. All of the soldiers were frightened as they eventually figured they were behind enemy lines. Philippe insisted on leading the platoon. That is when a German ambush killed him.

With regards to Maurice, I have heard various accounts of what had happened. His mission was to meet up with a Maquis agent also named Rousseau who would have been a distant relative. They never had the chance to meet as the Maquis agent had already been killed by the time Maurice arrived.

The story about the priest showing the room to the German soldiers, I had been told that Maurice was hiding behind the door that the priest had just opened. He had his knife in hand. The Germans had checked several rooms and had asked about the one that Maurice would be in. The priest insisted on showing the Germans the room in question. Due to the instance of the priest, the Germans only took a peek inside the room instead of the more thorough verifications that had been done in other rooms.

In any event, I heard that Maurice died while providing cover to other allied soldiers. Another story I heard was that he did not die  but was wounded and captured. He would have been likely tortured for info and would have been executed as part of Hitler’s “Commando order”. However, I do not know if this is true, just what I have heard and read.

On a side note, both men were against the draft as they thought no-one should be forced to go to war. They were volunteers.

In any event, it is nice to see these young brave men remembered and honored. Me and my family truly appreciate this.

Have a wonderful day.

Best regards,

Daniel

Hi Pierre,

In any event, I attached a picture of Philippe with my mom and uncle. While there is no year for the picture, this I am told, may have been one of the last times that my mom would have seen her uncle. I have been told that this may have been taken shortly before Philippe’s final departure to Europe.

Last tid-bit;

My mom remembers waking up one morning to find her dad (Philippe’s older brother Jacques) crying. He was holding 2 letters, which would have been from the military. The 1st letter was the news that Philippe had been killed in combat. The 2nd letter stating that Maurice was missing and the worst was feared. My poor grandfather found out that he lost 2 brothers in a single day. It was one of the most striking moments of my mom’s life as my grandfather was not at all prone to publicly emoting.

Among my mom’s things are the silver “Airborne” division wings pin. This was one of my mom’s most precious belongings.

Again, thank you for your work

Have a fantastic day.

Kindest regards,

Daniel

Souvenirs de guerre

Les frères Rousseau avaient été au Collège militaire de Kingston.

Voici l’article que le Centre Juno Beach m’a envoyé cette semaine. Il a été écrit en décembre 1945. Il est de la plume de G.-H. Dagneau.

Claude Rousseau, le frère de Philippe et Maurice, s’est rendu en France le 11 septembre 1945. Il a visité en premier la Lorraine et ensuite le Calvados. Il a su ce qui était arrivé à ses frères.

Philippe est mort en héros le 6 juin 1944, deux heures seulement après avoir sauté en parachute. Maurice est mort le 17 septembre, trois mois plus tard aussi comme un héros en Lorraine.

Vous pouvez lire en cliquant sur les images et zoomer ensuite sur votre explorateur pour lire le texte.



Au cours de son voyage, M. Claude Rousseau apprit que son frère avait aussi pour mission de rencontrer à Banville, le maire de la place qui…

View original post 148 more words

The Rousseau brothers: the true story

Lieutenant Rousseau never completed his mission.

Claude Rousseau went to France to find out what had happen to his two brothers.

This is a newspaper article written in December 1945.

Philippe died two hours after his parachute drop. His platoon was caught in a cross fire in Gonneville-sur-Mer.

A farmer found him in a ditch the next morning.

Maurice died on September 17, 1944 in Lorraine against overwhelming odds.


Update 9 March 2022

Emails from a relative

Hi there,

I wanted to thank you for the great page you have so kindly dedicated to my great uncles Philippe and Maurice Rousseau.

I grew up hearing their valiant stories which always remain with me.

Regarding the picture in which you originally believed to be Philippe (with his 2 sisters) was actually a soldier in Philippe’s division called Moffat (I have never seen the name spelled and I do not know much about him)

After Philippe was killed and the fighting died down, the rest of the platoon was captured including Mr. Moffat. He came by the family residence to tell the story of Philippe.

Interesting tidbit, Moffat and the rest of the platoon were moved to a prison camp in the mountains where they remained for quite some time. One of the German guards was looking for a skiing buddy and Moffat was his man. He spent a portion of his internment skiing. The German officer did say that if he tried to escape, he would be shot. Nevertheless, Mr. Moffat was able to tell our family of the heroism of Philippe.

The story I had been told was that Philippe’s battalion had been dropped at the wrong place. All of the soldiers were frightened as they eventually figured they were behind enemy lines. Philippe insisted on leading the platoon. That is when a German ambush killed him. 

 

With regards to Maurice, I have heard various accounts of what had happened. His mission was to meet up with a Maquis agent also named Rousseau who would have been a distant relative. They never had the chance to meet as the Maquis agent had already been killed by the time Maurice arrived.

The story about the priest showing the room to the German soldiers, I had been told that Maurice was hiding behind the door that the priest had just opened. He had his knife in hand. The Germans had checked several rooms and had asked about the one that Maurice would be in. The priest insisted on showing the Germans the room in question. Due to the instance of the priest, the Germans only took a peek inside the room instead of the more thorough verifications that had been done in other rooms.

In any event, I heard that Maurice died while providing cover to other allied soldiers. Another story I heard was that he did not die  but was wounded and captured. He would have been likely tortured for info and would have been executed as part of Hitler’s “Commando order”. However, I do not know if this is true, just what I have heard and read.

 

On a side note, both men were against the draft as they thought no-one should be forced to go to war. They were volunteers.

In any event, it is nice to see these young brave men remembered and honored. Me and my family truly appreciate this.

Have a wonderful day.

Best regards,

Daniel


Hi Pierre,

In any event, I attached a picture of Philippe with my mom and uncle. While there is no year for the picture, this I am told, may have been one of the last times that my mom would have seen her uncle. I have been told that this may have been taken shortly before Philippe’s final departure to Europe.

Last tid-bit;

My mom remembers waking up one morning to find her dad (Philippe’s older brother Jacques) crying. He was holding 2 letters, which would have been from the military. The 1st letter was the news that Philippe had been killed in combat. The 2nd letter stating that Maurice was missing and the worst was feared. My poor grandfather found out that he lost 2 brothers in a single day. It was one of the most striking moments of my mom’s life as my grandfather was not at all prone to publicly emoting.

Among my mom’s things are the silver “Airborne” division wings pin. This was one of my mom’s most precious belongings.

Again, thank you for your work 

Have a fantastic day.

Kindest regards,

Daniel

Did Lieutenant Rousseau complete his mission?

Having been parachuted away from the designated DZ did not discourage him because he had been parachuted closer to his objective than expected. Lieutenant Rousseau took off immediately in the direction of Dozulé to complete his mission with the four soldiers he had met.

Two hours later, the five men were caught in a cross fire with German soldiers and lieutenant Rousseau and Oxtoby one the soldier died instantly.
“It is very likely Lieutenant Rousseau would not have been killed if he had taken the usual place as officer of his rank would do. But as usual, he took care of his men first and he was leading them in front of the small squad” recalls Irwin Willsey one of the four soldier.

Bullets struck Lieutenant Rousseau’s phosphorus grenades he was carrying on his belt and they burst into flames.

However, opinions differ if he died of burns or from enemy shots. Two of the soldiers accompanying him managed to escape, then the third was wounded and taken prisoner soon afterwards.
“Lieutenant Rousseau was a true soldier, a man of honour, and well-disciplined and I am convinced that he made the impossible to carry out his mission on Dozulé.” If he did not have this order, it would have remained in the area to find the rest of his group.

Corporal Anderson (Gonneville-sur-Mer 1939-1944)

It is therefore unclear if Lieutenant Rousseau was able to complete his mission.

Corporal Anderson said that Rousseau died on June 6, but he was not with him because they had been separated from the start.

I found a Website. It is about la commune de Dozulé in France and a section is dedicated to Dozulé and the war.

I have found this page…

I have written an e-mail to the Town Hall.

I have yet to get a response.


 

Update 9 March 2022

Emails from a relative

Hi there,

I wanted to thank you for the great page you have so kindly dedicated to my great uncles Philippe and Maurice Rousseau.

I grew up hearing their valiant stories which always remain with me.

Regarding the picture in which you originally believed to be Philippe (with his 2 sisters) was actually a soldier in Philippe’s division called Moffat (I have never seen the name spelled and I do not know much about him)

After Philippe was killed and the fighting died down, the rest of the platoon was captured including Mr. Moffat. He came by the family residence to tell the story of Philippe.

Interesting tidbit, Moffat and the rest of the platoon were moved to a prison camp in the mountains where they remained for quite some time. One of the German guards was looking for a skiing buddy and Moffat was his man. He spent a portion of his internment skiing. The German officer did say that if he tried to escape, he would be shot. Nevertheless, Mr. Moffat was able to tell our family of the heroism of Philippe.

The story I had been told was that Philippe’s battalion had been dropped at the wrong place. All of the soldiers were frightened as they eventually figured they were behind enemy lines. Philippe insisted on leading the platoon. That is when a German ambush killed him. 

 

With regards to Maurice, I have heard various accounts of what had happened. His mission was to meet up with a Maquis agent also named Rousseau who would have been a distant relative. They never had the chance to meet as the Maquis agent had already been killed by the time Maurice arrived.

The story about the priest showing the room to the German soldiers, I had been told that Maurice was hiding behind the door that the priest had just opened. He had his knife in hand. The Germans had checked several rooms and had asked about the one that Maurice would be in. The priest insisted on showing the Germans the room in question. Due to the instance of the priest, the Germans only took a peek inside the room instead of the more thorough verifications that had been done in other rooms.

In any event, I heard that Maurice died while providing cover to other allied soldiers. Another story I heard was that he did not die  but was wounded and captured. He would have been likely tortured for info and would have been executed as part of Hitler’s “Commando order”. However, I do not know if this is true, just what I have heard and read.

 

On a side note, both men were against the draft as they thought no-one should be forced to go to war. They were volunteers.

In any event, it is nice to see these young brave men remembered and honored. Me and my family truly appreciate this.

Have a wonderful day.

Best regards,

Daniel


Hi Pierre,

In any event, I attached a picture of Philippe with my mom and uncle. While there is no year for the picture, this I am told, may have been one of the last times that my mom would have seen her uncle. I have been told that this may have been taken shortly before Philippe’s final departure to Europe.

Last tid-bit;

My mom remembers waking up one morning to find her dad (Philippe’s older brother Jacques) crying. He was holding 2 letters, which would have been from the military. The 1st letter was the news that Philippe had been killed in combat. The 2nd letter stating that Maurice was missing and the worst was feared. My poor grandfather found out that he lost 2 brothers in a single day. It was one of the most striking moments of my mom’s life as my grandfather was not at all prone to publicly emoting.

Among my mom’s things are the silver “Airborne” division wings pin. This was one of my mom’s most precious belongings.

Again, thank you for your work 

Have a fantastic day.

Kindest regards,

Daniel

 

Blessent mon coeur d’une langueur monotone…

I left with this last Monday…

While his men tried to regroup, Lieutenant Rousseau succeeded in his secret mission with two other men, James George Broadfoot and corporal Boyd Anderson.

Corporal Anderson explains their mission this way:

Lt Rousseau explained that some ten miles or so from our drop zone was the town of Dozule, which our intelligence people did not know very much about. It was located on a main highway going to Caen. The name of the mayor of Dozule was also Rousseau, the same name as my officer. It was thought that the mayor was friendly to our cause.

The plan was for Lt Rousseau, the batman Broadfoot, and me to meet in the drop zone with all haste. We were to ignore whatever trouble was going on and to proceed immediately by whatever means we could to Dozule and locate Mayor Rousseau and strike up a conversation with him with the hope of establishing a relationship and find out the numbers and disposition of the German troops in the area.

Lt Rousseau was very excited about this assignment and of course I was pleased to have been selected for this dangerous but unusual task and, like Lt Rousseau, I was all gung ho to get at the job. Little did I know that Lt Rousseau would be killed in the early daylight hours of the first day and that Broadfoot would be shot to death in the ditch the next afternoon just a few feet from were I was located behind a hedgerow.

(Boys of the Cloud)

Being the last one to jump from the Dakota, Lieutenant Rousseau only found four of his men and could not locate neither Broadfoot nor Anderson. He immediately proceeded towards the nearest house to take check his location. He found out by talking to the people that he had parachuted 20 kilometres east of his objective.

Come back tomorrow for the rest of the story.


Update 9 March 2022

Emails from a relative

Hi there,

I wanted to thank you for the great page you have so kindly dedicated to my great uncles Philippe and Maurice Rousseau.

I grew up hearing their valiant stories which always remain with me.

Regarding the picture in which you originally believed to be Philippe (with his 2 sisters) was actually a soldier in Philippe’s division called Moffat (I have never seen the name spelled and I do not know much about him)

After Philippe was killed and the fighting died down, the rest of the platoon was captured including Mr. Moffat. He came by the family residence to tell the story of Philippe.

Interesting tidbit, Moffat and the rest of the platoon were moved to a prison camp in the mountains where they remained for quite some time. One of the German guards was looking for a skiing buddy and Moffat was his man. He spent a portion of his internment skiing. The German officer did say that if he tried to escape, he would be shot. Nevertheless, Mr. Moffat was able to tell our family of the heroism of Philippe.

The story I had been told was that Philippe’s battalion had been dropped at the wrong place. All of the soldiers were frightened as they eventually figured they were behind enemy lines. Philippe insisted on leading the platoon. That is when a German ambush killed him. 

 

With regards to Maurice, I have heard various accounts of what had happened. His mission was to meet up with a Maquis agent also named Rousseau who would have been a distant relative. They never had the chance to meet as the Maquis agent had already been killed by the time Maurice arrived.

The story about the priest showing the room to the German soldiers, I had been told that Maurice was hiding behind the door that the priest had just opened. He had his knife in hand. The Germans had checked several rooms and had asked about the one that Maurice would be in. The priest insisted on showing the Germans the room in question. Due to the instance of the priest, the Germans only took a peek inside the room instead of the more thorough verifications that had been done in other rooms.

In any event, I heard that Maurice died while providing cover to other allied soldiers. Another story I heard was that he did not die  but was wounded and captured. He would have been likely tortured for info and would have been executed as part of Hitler’s “Commando order”. However, I do not know if this is true, just what I have heard and read.

 

On a side note, both men were against the draft as they thought no-one should be forced to go to war. They were volunteers.

In any event, it is nice to see these young brave men remembered and honored. Me and my family truly appreciate this.

Have a wonderful day.

Best regards,

Daniel


Hi Pierre,

In any event, I attached a picture of Philippe with my mom and uncle. While there is no year for the picture, this I am told, may have been one of the last times that my mom would have seen her uncle. I have been told that this may have been taken shortly before Philippe’s final departure to Europe.

Last tid-bit;

My mom remembers waking up one morning to find her dad (Philippe’s older brother Jacques) crying. He was holding 2 letters, which would have been from the military. The 1st letter was the news that Philippe had been killed in combat. The 2nd letter stating that Maurice was missing and the worst was feared. My poor grandfather found out that he lost 2 brothers in a single day. It was one of the most striking moments of my mom’s life as my grandfather was not at all prone to publicly emoting.

Among my mom’s things are the silver “Airborne” division wings pin. This was one of my mom’s most precious belongings.

Again, thank you for your work 

Have a fantastic day.

Kindest regards,

Daniel

June 6, 1944… Les sanglots longs des violons de l’automne

On June 6, 1944, Philippe and Maurice Rousseau, sons of Lacasse Rousseau, one of the most respected families of Montmagny, were killed in combat.

They were both paratroopers and officers.

Philippe, still attach to his parachute, was killed even before he could touch ground at Gonnevilles-sur-Mer.

He was 33.

His brother Maurice was also a paratrooper and was assisting members of the French Resistance in Operation Loyton in order to disrupt the railway system in the region.

He died in Lorraine in the month of September 1944. He had just married Agnes Horsnby in England before he left for combat.

This is what I found while conducting research, but I just can’t remember where I found that info…

My memory is playing tricks on me…

Philippe was not killed in his parachute on the night of June 5-June 6, and he was not 33 years old.

This is a perfect example of a factoid.

Here are the facts…

 

Philippe died in combat on June 7, 1944 .

Here is the proof…

 

 

LT. J. P. ROUSSEAU
1 CDN PARA BN
KA
7 6 44

This image was on the blog of the young guide of Juno Beach Centre.
This is most probably taken for a newspaper clip. It shows the temporary burial site of Lieutenant Rousseau.

So we have confirmation of the date he died:

June 7, 1944

We can safely conclude that he led his platoon on the night of the parachute drop, and on June 6 and during part of June 7.

Let us continue with the story of the young guide who worked at the Juno Beach Centre…

The invasion

Although the Drop Zone (DZ) should have been only a few hundred meters large and have already been secured by Company C , many problems were encountered so paratroopers were dropped in an area 40 times larger than planned. The paratroopers landed isolated from one another and in a precarious environment. A large number of them either drowned in fields flooded by the Germans unable to move because of extra gear and ammunition they carried, or were taken prisoners by the Germans who had been alerted the imminence of an invasion.

While his men tried to regroup, Lieutenant Rousseau succeeded in his secret mission with two other men, James George Broadfoot and corporal Boyd Anderson.

Corporal Anderson explains their mission this way:

Lt Rousseau explained that some ten miles or so from our drop zone was the town of Dozule, which our intelligence people did not know very much about. It was located on a main highway going to Caen. The name of the mayor of Dozule was also Rousseau, the same name as my officer. It was thought that the mayor was friendly to our cause.

The plan was for Lt Rousseau, the batman Broadfoot, and me to meet in the drop zone with all haste. We were to ignore whatever trouble was going on and to proceed immediately by whatever means we could to Dozule and locate Mayor Rousseau and strike up a conversation with him with the hope of establishing a relationship and find out the numbers and disposition of the German troops in the area.

Lt Rousseau was very excited about this assignment and of course I was pleased to have been selected for this dangerous but unusual task and, like Lt Rousseau, I was all gung ho to get at the job. Little did I know that Lt Rousseau would be killed in the early daylight hours of the first day and that Broadfoot would be shot to death in the ditch the next afternoon just a few feet from were I was located behind a hedgerow.

(Boys of the Cloud)

 

To be continued…


Update 9 March 2022

Emails from a relative

Hi there,

I wanted to thank you for the great page you have so kindly dedicated to my great uncles Philippe and Maurice Rousseau.

I grew up hearing their valiant stories which always remain with me.

Regarding the picture in which you originally believed to be Philippe (with his 2 sisters) was actually a soldier in Philippe’s division called Moffat (I have never seen the name spelled and I do not know much about him)

After Philippe was killed and the fighting died down, the rest of the platoon was captured including Mr. Moffat. He came by the family residence to tell the story of Philippe.

Interesting tidbit, Moffat and the rest of the platoon were moved to a prison camp in the mountains where they remained for quite some time. One of the German guards was looking for a skiing buddy and Moffat was his man. He spent a portion of his internment skiing. The German officer did say that if he tried to escape, he would be shot. Nevertheless, Mr. Moffat was able to tell our family of the heroism of Philippe.

The story I had been told was that Philippe’s battalion had been dropped at the wrong place. All of the soldiers were frightened as they eventually figured they were behind enemy lines. Philippe insisted on leading the platoon. That is when a German ambush killed him. 

 

With regards to Maurice, I have heard various accounts of what had happened. His mission was to meet up with a Maquis agent also named Rousseau who would have been a distant relative. They never had the chance to meet as the Maquis agent had already been killed by the time Maurice arrived.

The story about the priest showing the room to the German soldiers, I had been told that Maurice was hiding behind the door that the priest had just opened. He had his knife in hand. The Germans had checked several rooms and had asked about the one that Maurice would be in. The priest insisted on showing the Germans the room in question. Due to the instance of the priest, the Germans only took a peek inside the room instead of the more thorough verifications that had been done in other rooms.

In any event, I heard that Maurice died while providing cover to other allied soldiers. Another story I heard was that he did not die  but was wounded and captured. He would have been likely tortured for info and would have been executed as part of Hitler’s “Commando order”. However, I do not know if this is true, just what I have heard and read.

 

On a side note, both men were against the draft as they thought no-one should be forced to go to war. They were volunteers.

In any event, it is nice to see these young brave men remembered and honored. Me and my family truly appreciate this.

Have a wonderful day.

Best regards,

Daniel


Hi Pierre,

In any event, I attached a picture of Philippe with my mom and uncle. While there is no year for the picture, this I am told, may have been one of the last times that my mom would have seen her uncle. I have been told that this may have been taken shortly before Philippe’s final departure to Europe.

Last tid-bit;

My mom remembers waking up one morning to find her dad (Philippe’s older brother Jacques) crying. He was holding 2 letters, which would have been from the military. The 1st letter was the news that Philippe had been killed in combat. The 2nd letter stating that Maurice was missing and the worst was feared. My poor grandfather found out that he lost 2 brothers in a single day. It was one of the most striking moments of my mom’s life as my grandfather was not at all prone to publicly emoting.

Among my mom’s things are the silver “Airborne” division wings pin. This was one of my mom’s most precious belongings.

Again, thank you for your work 

Have a fantastic day.

Kindest regards,

Daniel

Lieutenant Philippe Rousseau an unknown hero even in his hometown

I will continue to translate what the young guide wrote about Philippe Rousseau.

Lieutenant Philippe Rousseau

May 2, 1921 – June 6, 1944

Killed in Gonneville-sur-Mer, Calvados, France

Philippe Rousseau was born in Montreal, but lived in Montmagny near Quebec City. He was the son of Lacasse Rousseau, an electrician and engineer, and Gabrielle Fafard.

Philippe is on the far left, Maurice is right beside him.

The couple had 14 children, 12 boys and 2 girls. Among them was Lieutenant Maurice Rousseau who was with the Special Air Service (SAS), Jacques, director of the Jardin Botanique de Montréal, and his two sisters Pauline et Marie who were studying medecine. We see them with Philippe on this picture (see note for an update).

Comment for a reader about this picture:
After looking at a few photos of Philippe prior to jumping on 6 june, I have come to the conclusion it is not him. However there are some spooky similarities. It would be interesting to know who that is. I also do not think he is an officer. Definitely a member of the Parachute Battalion though. He has also re-applied the AIRBORNE strip patches below his formation badges. These were supposed to be removed in December 1944. Some put them back on however when they came home. 
 
Regards
 
Ken 

Philippe Rousseau joined le Régiment de la Chaudière in Lévis before enlisting with the 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion when it was first created in July 1942. He was already an officer, graduating from Royal Military College in Kingston with his brother Maurice. He qualified as a paratrooper in Ringway, England at the end of 1943, just after his brother. On the picture, Philippe is on the left and Maurice on the right, as members of the 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion.

Philippe and Maurice Rousseau

During the winter of 1943-1944, he took over Maurice’s assignment as Lieutenant in charge of B Company, no. 4 Platoon.

B Company

He did not speak English that much but he learned fast. He would talk with such passion that his men would never forget what he said to them.

Maurice joined the SAS, the Special Air Service, giving up his rank of captain to become a lieutenant.

« He was eager to come to grips with the enemy and had no way of knowing when D-Day would be. » (A Rising of courage)

The SAS was a British paratrooper unit part of special commandos. Their missions were always the most dangerous ones carrying sabotage missions behind enemy lines, robbing banks to provide German money to allies, or attacking convoys and preventing reinforcements to the front lines. The SAS were such a nuisance to the Germans that Hitler ordered that any member of the SAS taken prisoner be immediately shot.

See you next Monday…One of Philippe’s men talks about him in Gary Boegel’s book Boys of the Clouds


Les sanglots longs des violons de l’automne.


Update 9 March 2022

Emails from a relative

Hi there,

I wanted to thank you for the great page you have so kindly dedicated to my great uncles Philippe and Maurice Rousseau.

I grew up hearing their valiant stories which always remain with me.

Regarding the picture in which you originally believed to be Philippe (with his 2 sisters) was actually a soldier in Philippe’s division called Moffat (I have never seen the name spelled and I do not know much about him)

After Philippe was killed and the fighting died down, the rest of the platoon was captured including Mr. Moffat. He came by the family residence to tell the story of Philippe.

Interesting tidbit, Moffat and the rest of the platoon were moved to a prison camp in the mountains where they remained for quite some time. One of the German guards was looking for a skiing buddy and Moffat was his man. He spent a portion of his internment skiing. The German officer did say that if he tried to escape, he would be shot. Nevertheless, Mr. Moffat was able to tell our family of the heroism of Philippe.

The story I had been told was that Philippe’s battalion had been dropped at the wrong place. All of the soldiers were frightened as they eventually figured they were behind enemy lines. Philippe insisted on leading the platoon. That is when a German ambush killed him. 

 

With regards to Maurice, I have heard various accounts of what had happened. His mission was to meet up with a Maquis agent also named Rousseau who would have been a distant relative. They never had the chance to meet as the Maquis agent had already been killed by the time Maurice arrived.

The story about the priest showing the room to the German soldiers, I had been told that Maurice was hiding behind the door that the priest had just opened. He had his knife in hand. The Germans had checked several rooms and had asked about the one that Maurice would be in. The priest insisted on showing the Germans the room in question. Due to the instance of the priest, the Germans only took a peek inside the room instead of the more thorough verifications that had been done in other rooms.

In any event, I heard that Maurice died while providing cover to other allied soldiers. Another story I heard was that he did not die  but was wounded and captured. He would have been likely tortured for info and would have been executed as part of Hitler’s “Commando order”. However, I do not know if this is true, just what I have heard and read.

 

On a side note, both men were against the draft as they thought no-one should be forced to go to war. They were volunteers.

In any event, it is nice to see these young brave men remembered and honored. Me and my family truly appreciate this.

Have a wonderful day.

Best regards,

Daniel


Hi Pierre,

In any event, I attached a picture of Philippe with my mom and uncle. While there is no year for the picture, this I am told, may have been one of the last times that my mom would have seen her uncle. I have been told that this may have been taken shortly before Philippe’s final departure to Europe.

Last tid-bit;

My mom remembers waking up one morning to find her dad (Philippe’s older brother Jacques) crying. He was holding 2 letters, which would have been from the military. The 1st letter was the news that Philippe had been killed in combat. The 2nd letter stating that Maurice was missing and the worst was feared. My poor grandfather found out that he lost 2 brothers in a single day. It was one of the most striking moments of my mom’s life as my grandfather was not at all prone to publicly emoting.

Among my mom’s things are the silver “Airborne” division wings pin. This was one of my mom’s most precious belongings.

Again, thank you for your work 

Have a fantastic day.

Kindest regards,

Daniel

Someone else found information about the Rousseau brothers

Updated 9 March 2022

See the update at the end.


Original post

I found someone who is writing a blog on the Internet. This young lady was a guide in the Juno Beach Centre in Courseulles-sur-Mer in Normandy.

Juno Beach Centre

She mostly talks about her travel experience but she also talks about the Rousseau brothers. This is her introduction. It is written in French but I will translate it for you.

March 31

I received an e-mail from Normandy today. It is not that my homework were not unexpected, but there they were. My first task consisted in finding a Canadian soldier fallen in battle and buried in one of two cemeteries near Courseulles-sur-mer. I had…

1) To find a soldier
2) To try to find some facts from his past to get any sort of factoïdes
3) To try to find of members of his family still living for a little chat
4) Prepare a 5 minute presentation.

I spent all morning long looking on the Internet for a French Canadian fallen in Normandy. I stumbled upon Lieutenant Philippe Rousseau, a native of Montmagny, a paratrooper who died on June 6th, 1944, the night of the landing in Normandy. His brother Maurice died 3 months later in Normandy also and they are buried one next to the other in the Ranville cemetery.

By writing to the Canadian Parachute Regiment, I was put in touch with Jan De Vries, a veteran who belonged to the 1st Canadian parachute battalion.

April 5

Mr De Vries had only little information about the Rousseau brothers, since he did not know them personaly. He refered me to  Andrew Roy, another veteran who was in touch with three brothers and sisters of the Rousseau three years ago.

April 7

I call Mister Roy. He first told me that the Rousseau family was not interested in sharing the story of the brothers when he met them. He told me not to get in touch with them, which limited my opportunity for additional information for my biography. He refered me instead to Alain Sillas.

Mister Roy told me that while he was placing Canadian flags on the graves of the Rousseau brothers in Ranville cemetery in 2004, a man, Mister Sillas, asked him if he knew them. He answered he had served with them during the war. Mister Sillas told him he was writing a book with a few chapters about the Rousseau brothers . The father of his wife had served with Maurice in the British Special Air Service, a paratooper commando group who were called on the most dangerous missions. Maurice Rousseau had died allowing his father-in-law and two other men to escape. This is why Mister Sillas wanted to honour all these Canadians who had come to Europe to fight and who had died.

I got in touch with Mister Sillas and he invited me to visit him during my stay in Paris. Meanwhile I visited the library and I browsed through books on the Normandy landing and on the paratroopers to find any information that could help me in my research.

April 24

I arrived in Paris for 24 hours. I went to suburbs to meet Mister Sillas. I have already shown you the pictures of his apartment and his fascinating and impressive collection of war artefacts,

April 29

During our stop in Ranville cemetery during our training, I made my small five minute presentation. In fact, I believe it lasted maybe a little more because I found it was important to talk about Philippe, but also about his brother Maurice because their stories were intertwined.

Come back next week.


Update 9 March 2022

Emails from a relative

Hi there,

I wanted to thank you for the great page you have so kindly dedicated to my great uncles Philippe and Maurice Rousseau.

I grew up hearing their valiant stories which always remain with me.

Regarding the picture in which you originally believed to be Philippe (with his 2 sisters) was actually a soldier in Philippe’s division called Moffat (I have never seen the name spelled and I do not know much about him)

After Philippe was killed and the fighting died down, the rest of the platoon was captured including Mr. Moffat. He came by the family residence to tell the story of Philippe.

Interesting tidbit, Moffat and the rest of the platoon were moved to a prison camp in the mountains where they remained for quite some time. One of the German guards was looking for a skiing buddy and Moffat was his man. He spent a portion of his internment skiing. The German officer did say that if he tried to escape, he would be shot. Nevertheless, Mr. Moffat was able to tell our family of the heroism of Philippe.

The story I had been told was that Philippe’s battalion had been dropped at the wrong place. All of the soldiers were frightened as they eventually figured they were behind enemy lines. Philippe insisted on leading the platoon. That is when a German ambush killed him. 

 

With regards to Maurice, I have heard various accounts of what had happened. His mission was to meet up with a Maquis agent also named Rousseau who would have been a distant relative. They never had the chance to meet as the Maquis agent had already been killed by the time Maurice arrived.

The story about the priest showing the room to the German soldiers, I had been told that Maurice was hiding behind the door that the priest had just opened. He had his knife in hand. The Germans had checked several rooms and had asked about the one that Maurice would be in. The priest insisted on showing the Germans the room in question. Due to the instance of the priest, the Germans only took a peek inside the room instead of the more thorough verifications that had been done in other rooms.

In any event, I heard that Maurice died while providing cover to other allied soldiers. Another story I heard was that he did not die  but was wounded and captured. He would have been likely tortured for info and would have been executed as part of Hitler’s “Commando order”. However, I do not know if this is true, just what I have heard and read.

 

On a side note, both men were against the draft as they thought no-one should be forced to go to war. They were volunteers.

In any event, it is nice to see these young brave men remembered and honored. Me and my family truly appreciate this.

Have a wonderful day.

Best regards,

Daniel


Hi Pierre,

In any event, I attached a picture of Philippe with my mom and uncle. While there is no year for the picture, this I am told, may have been one of the last times that my mom would have seen her uncle. I have been told that this may have been taken shortly before Philippe’s final departure to Europe.

Last tid-bit;

My mom remembers waking up one morning to find her dad (Philippe’s older brother Jacques) crying. He was holding 2 letters, which would have been from the military. The 1st letter was the news that Philippe had been killed in combat. The 2nd letter stating that Maurice was missing and the worst was feared. My poor grandfather found out that he lost 2 brothers in a single day. It was one of the most striking moments of my mom’s life as my grandfather was not at all prone to publicly emoting.

Among my mom’s things are the silver “Airborne” division wings pin. This was one of my mom’s most precious belongings.

Again, thank you for your work 

Have a fantastic day.

Kindest regards,

Daniel

 

Maurice Rousseau 1919-1944

Maurice Rousseau is Philippe’s brother.

Philippe Rousseau

Maurice is buried alongside Philippe.

Maurice as well as Philippe were war heroes

They are also unknown war heroes.

I don’t believe they were ever decorated.

This is the info found on the Canadian Virtual War Memorial site…

In memory of
Lieutenant
JOSEPH MAURICE  ROUSSEAU
who died on September 20, 1944

Military Service:

Force: Army
Unit: 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion, R.C.I.C.

Additional Information:
Son of J. M. A. L. and Gabrielle Fafard Rousseau, of Montreal, Quebec. Husband of Agnes Hornby Rousseau, of Montreal.

Burial Information:
Cemetery:
RANVILLE WAR CEMETERY
Calvados, France

Someone had sent a picture of Maurice Rousseau…

Click here.

The picture is not Maurice but Philippe.

Someone mixed up the two brothers.

This is Maurice.

Maurice Rousseau

How do I know?

Simple…

Next time, I will tell you more about the Rousseau brothers and how they are war heroes.


Update 9 March 2022

Emails from a relative

Hi there,

I wanted to thank you for the great page you have so kindly dedicated to my great uncles Philippe and Maurice Rousseau.

I grew up hearing their valiant stories which always remain with me.

Regarding the picture in which you originally believed to be Philippe (with his 2 sisters) was actually a soldier in Philippe’s division called Moffat (I have never seen the name spelled and I do not know much about him)

After Philippe was killed and the fighting died down, the rest of the platoon was captured including Mr. Moffat. He came by the family residence to tell the story of Philippe.

Interesting tidbit, Moffat and the rest of the platoon were moved to a prison camp in the mountains where they remained for quite some time. One of the German guards was looking for a skiing buddy and Moffat was his man. He spent a portion of his internment skiing. The German officer did say that if he tried to escape, he would be shot. Nevertheless, Mr. Moffat was able to tell our family of the heroism of Philippe.

The story I had been told was that Philippe’s battalion had been dropped at the wrong place. All of the soldiers were frightened as they eventually figured they were behind enemy lines. Philippe insisted on leading the platoon. That is when a German ambush killed him. 

 

With regards to Maurice, I have heard various accounts of what had happened. His mission was to meet up with a Maquis agent also named Rousseau who would have been a distant relative. They never had the chance to meet as the Maquis agent had already been killed by the time Maurice arrived.

The story about the priest showing the room to the German soldiers, I had been told that Maurice was hiding behind the door that the priest had just opened. He had his knife in hand. The Germans had checked several rooms and had asked about the one that Maurice would be in. The priest insisted on showing the Germans the room in question. Due to the instance of the priest, the Germans only took a peek inside the room instead of the more thorough verifications that had been done in other rooms.

In any event, I heard that Maurice died while providing cover to other allied soldiers. Another story I heard was that he did not die  but was wounded and captured. He would have been likely tortured for info and would have been executed as part of Hitler’s “Commando order”. However, I do not know if this is true, just what I have heard and read.

 

On a side note, both men were against the draft as they thought no-one should be forced to go to war. They were volunteers.

In any event, it is nice to see these young brave men remembered and honored. Me and my family truly appreciate this.

Have a wonderful day.

Best regards,

Daniel


Hi Pierre,

In any event, I attached a picture of Philippe with my mom and uncle. While there is no year for the picture, this I am told, may have been one of the last times that my mom would have seen her uncle. I have been told that this may have been taken shortly before Philippe’s final departure to Europe.

Last tid-bit;

My mom remembers waking up one morning to find her dad (Philippe’s older brother Jacques) crying. He was holding 2 letters, which would have been from the military. The 1st letter was the news that Philippe had been killed in combat. The 2nd letter stating that Maurice was missing and the worst was feared. My poor grandfather found out that he lost 2 brothers in a single day. It was one of the most striking moments of my mom’s life as my grandfather was not at all prone to publicly emoting.

Among my mom’s things are the silver “Airborne” division wings pin. This was one of my mom’s most precious belongings.

Again, thank you for your work 

Have a fantastic day.

Kindest regards,

Daniel

Philippe Rousseau 1921-1944

This is Philippe Rousseau’s headstone…

Lieutenant Paratrooper
Philippe Rousseau
Killed in combat
Normandie, June 1944

Someone posted it on the Internet.

This headstone is in his hometown, probably in Montmagny where the Rousseau brothers lived.

This is what I found about Philippe on the Canadian Virtual War Memorial…

 

In memory of
Lieutenant
JOSEPH PHILIPPE  ROUSSEAU
who died on June 7, 1944

Military Service:

Age: 23
Force: Army
Unit: 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion, R.C.I.C.

Additional Information:

Son of J. M. A. L. and Gabrielle Fafard Rousseau, of Montreal, Province of Quebec, Canada.

Cemetery:

RANVILLE WAR CEMETERY

Calvados, France

Grave Reference: VA. G. 8.

On the site we have a photograph of Philippe.

Lieutenant Philippe Rousseau

This is the headstone in France.

The bottom part of the epitaph says…

Ses vingt ans sont tombés sur le sol immortel d’où jaillirent ses aieux.

In English, it can be translated by…

His twenty years of life have fallen on the immortal ground of his ancestors…

I will start reading Gary’s book about the battalion when I receive it in the mail, probably today.

Come back next time, I will talk about Philippe’s brother and how sometimes what you find on the Internet is not always right…

If you want to share something with me you can write a comment.


Update 9 March 2022

Emails from a relative

Hi there,

I wanted to thank you for the great page you have so kindly dedicated to my great uncles Philippe and Maurice Rousseau.

I grew up hearing their valiant stories which always remain with me.

Regarding the picture in which you originally believed to be Philippe (with his 2 sisters) was actually a soldier in Philippe’s division called Moffat (I have never seen the name spelled and I do not know much about him)

After Philippe was killed and the fighting died down, the rest of the platoon was captured including Mr. Moffat. He came by the family residence to tell the story of Philippe.

Interesting tidbit, Moffat and the rest of the platoon were moved to a prison camp in the mountains where they remained for quite some time. One of the German guards was looking for a skiing buddy and Moffat was his man. He spent a portion of his internment skiing. The German officer did say that if he tried to escape, he would be shot. Nevertheless, Mr. Moffat was able to tell our family of the heroism of Philippe.

The story I had been told was that Philippe’s battalion had been dropped at the wrong place. All of the soldiers were frightened as they eventually figured they were behind enemy lines. Philippe insisted on leading the platoon. That is when a German ambush killed him. 

 

With regards to Maurice, I have heard various accounts of what had happened. His mission was to meet up with a Maquis agent also named Rousseau who would have been a distant relative. They never had the chance to meet as the Maquis agent had already been killed by the time Maurice arrived.

The story about the priest showing the room to the German soldiers, I had been told that Maurice was hiding behind the door that the priest had just opened. He had his knife in hand. The Germans had checked several rooms and had asked about the one that Maurice would be in. The priest insisted on showing the Germans the room in question. Due to the instance of the priest, the Germans only took a peek inside the room instead of the more thorough verifications that had been done in other rooms.

In any event, I heard that Maurice died while providing cover to other allied soldiers. Another story I heard was that he did not die  but was wounded and captured. He would have been likely tortured for info and would have been executed as part of Hitler’s “Commando order”. However, I do not know if this is true, just what I have heard and read.

 

On a side note, both men were against the draft as they thought no-one should be forced to go to war. They were volunteers.

In any event, it is nice to see these young brave men remembered and honored. Me and my family truly appreciate this.

Have a wonderful day.

Best regards,

Daniel


Hi Pierre,

In any event, I attached a picture of Philippe with my mom and uncle. While there is no year for the picture, this I am told, may have been one of the last times that my mom would have seen her uncle. I have been told that this may have been taken shortly before Philippe’s final departure to Europe.

Last tid-bit;

My mom remembers waking up one morning to find her dad (Philippe’s older brother Jacques) crying. He was holding 2 letters, which would have been from the military. The 1st letter was the news that Philippe had been killed in combat. The 2nd letter stating that Maurice was missing and the worst was feared. My poor grandfather found out that he lost 2 brothers in a single day. It was one of the most striking moments of my mom’s life as my grandfather was not at all prone to publicly emoting.

Among my mom’s things are the silver “Airborne” division wings pin. This was one of my mom’s most precious belongings.

Again, thank you for your work 

Have a fantastic day.

Kindest regards,

Daniel


 

Gary’s book is in the mail…

Updated 9 March 2022

This is what I wrote on Lest We Forget on February 12, 2010. It was the first time I was remembering the Rousseau brothers here. The update is at the end.


Original post

I got a notice from Canada Post…

The book is in the mail.


I just can’t wait to read it. People who bought the book say it is great.

“I am so glad to get your book. I ordered five from the publishing co. in Victoria. I ordered 2 at first, one for me and one for my son in Japan; and then all my grandsons wanted a copy so I must say it was worth it. You did a wonderful job of it. I know my Joe is in history. I COULD NOT PUT IT DOWN. I love all the stories and I knew quite a few from the reunions, especially Earl Rice. He was in the reserve with Joe. Joe ended up becoming a major. The boys loved calling him SIR. THANK YOU AGAIN, YOU DID A SUPERB BOOK, I LOVE IT.”
— Pauline, Canada

“I loved every page of the book. I love regimental histories, but to hear the stories in the words of the actual participants was very refreshing and very entertaining. A must for anyone interested in Canadian military history.”
— Andrew, Canada

“Gary, nice book, enjoyed reading it.”
— Thomas, Canada

“Yes I got your book and am reading it each night. An incredible amount of work has gone into it. As soon as the election is over I’ll give you a plug or two. I’m still reading it and enjoying it very much and plan on giving you a plug very shortly.”
— Lowell Green, Ottawa, Canada (Radio talk show host)

“I find your writing makes for most enjoyable reading and am surprised at the thoroughness of information. You certainly have done you homework in preparing for this endeavour – congratulations again! I can honestly appreciate the amount of effort you must have put into it Gary from how well you have put it down for us to read.”
— Robby, Canada (1st Canadian Parachute Battalion Veteran)

“Yes, I have read through the book (sporadically), and really enjoyed it….those guys were awesome! I think I’ll read a section at a time, “when the mood strikes.” My aunt (Larry’s wife) was absolutely overjoyed to receive it. She called me just before Xmas. She told me that she knows about 90% of the men in the book from meetings over the years. She was going to spend her Xmas week reading it from cover to cover, and it was the best Xmas present she could receive… Again, thanks for this book….really a “labour of love!””
— Rick, Canada

“And, just to let you know, my brother Scott absolutely LOVED the book, which won me the prize for the best Christmas gift in his family this year! I’m also looking forward to reading it.”
— Elizabeth, Canada

“Three of the books will be given as Christmas presents to my nephews. I’m not sure I can say this correctly. Because this is an oral history the words are my Dad’s, and I hear him so plainly. It is so special and sometimes, when I want him close I reread that part of your book, and remember many other times with him. Thank you, for taking the time to write the book.”
— Phyllis, Canada

“Anyway, I’ve started reading the book and all I can say is GREAT!!! You’ve done a magnificent job of editing. As I read it I’m looking back at my own experiences and find that we were all alike….mostly young, thrill seeking, wondering what was in store for us and, generally, having a ball. I’ll get back to you after I’ve read a bit more. Again, thank you for sending it to me, and it reads wonderfully well.”
— Bill, USA (1st Canadian Parachute Battalion Veteran)

“Your book turned out to be a tremendous amount of work and it took me some time to read it all. It never left the table so I could read it at every opportunity. It is a tremendous source of information. I even learned most of the names of those in Marcel Cote’s stick. Some years ago I received information from the Brit. FOO who was in that stick who wrote what happened to him and how he was finally captured, but I never knew any of the names of those he jumped with. Thank you for a terrific undertaking. We will promote in our newsletter and wherever we can. Well done!”
— Jan de Vries, President, 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion Association

“I presented the book to Eldon at his farewell party yesterday, as he was relating some of his war stories from Europe. He was excited and teary as I told him that it was a 10-year labour of love for you to record the oral history from the men and women who made it history.”
— Jonathan, Canada

“I’m reading your book, it is really a good book.”
— Lydia, The Netherlands

“Great book Gary – hats off to you!”
— Pat, Canada

“I gave him the book and showed him the writing on the inside cover by yourself. He is very delighted that someone, such as yourself, has taken the time and interest to honour and remember the 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion. He actually started to go over your book and he remembers a lot of the people whose names have been mentioned. I sat with him at his bed side and I could see it in his eyes that this book brought him much joy as he read about each member’s recollections from the past. He actually started to laugh at some of them as he remembered each person’s personality of what they must have been like back then. I also will read your book after my dad and I will let you know my thoughts. I’m sure they will be good thoughts and I can say on behalf of my dad that your book has scored high marks with him. On behalf of my father and myself, thanks once again Gary for remembering the past and bringing it to others with your book.”
— Randy, Canada

“By the way, very good book”
— Jeroen, The Netherlands

“I just completed reading “Boys Of The Clouds” and I must congratulate you on an outstanding book. I found the book to be thoroughly entertaining and totally engrossing, a real “can’t put it down” type of book. I really enjoyed reading the personal stories of all the paratroopers and the commitment and pride they felt was very evident. Thanks for a great book and keep up the good work.”
— Gerry, Canada

“Hi Gary, I had talked about doing the same type of thing but am so pleased you actually did it!!!! Congratulations!!!! Well done!!!!!”
— Chuck, Canada

“I have just got a copy of this book and must say it is a refreshing change from traditional history books. The first hand accounts make for a compelling and emotional read. My complements to the author for an amazing effort!”
— John, Canada

“Feedback on “Boys of the Clouds”. First of all, thank you for sending and autographing it. It will have an honoured space on my bookshelf. Being able to read the personal stories was so interesting. All in all, a wonderful experience to read this book. Again thank you for writing it and making it available to me.”
— Pat, New Zealand

“I will be on the lookout for your book, and congratulations on a job well done.”
— Dr. Patricia Skidmore, Canadian Oral History Association

“Your book is great. I will be posting a very positive review to our group later this week and will work to get a link up on the web site within the next round of updates.”
— Ted, USA

I can’t wait to read it…

Next time I will tell you all about the Rousseau brothers who were part of that battalion. They will never have a chance to read the book.

If you want to share something with me about the battalion, you can reach me by clicking here…


Update 9 March 2022

Emails from a relative

Hi there,

I wanted to thank you for the great page you have so kindly dedicated to my great uncles Philippe and Maurice Rousseau.

I grew up hearing their valiant stories which always remain with me.

Regarding the picture in which you originally believed to be Philippe (with his 2 sisters) was actually a soldier in Philippe’s division called Moffat (I have never seen the name spelled and I do not know much about him)

After Philippe was killed and the fighting died down, the rest of the platoon was captured including Mr. Moffat. He came by the family residence to tell the story of Philippe.

Interesting tidbit, Moffat and the rest of the platoon were moved to a prison camp in the mountains where they remained for quite some time. One of the German guards was looking for a skiing buddy and Moffat was his man. He spent a portion of his internment skiing. The German officer did say that if he tried to escape, he would be shot. Nevertheless, Mr. Moffat was able to tell our family of the heroism of Philippe.

The story I had been told was that Philippe’s battalion had been dropped at the wrong place. All of the soldiers were frightened as they eventually figured they were behind enemy lines. Philippe insisted on leading the platoon. That is when a German ambush killed him. 

 

With regards to Maurice, I have heard various accounts of what had happened. His mission was to meet up with a Maquis agent also named Rousseau who would have been a distant relative. They never had the chance to meet as the Maquis agent had already been killed by the time Maurice arrived.

The story about the priest showing the room to the German soldiers, I had been told that Maurice was hiding behind the door that the priest had just opened. He had his knife in hand. The Germans had checked several rooms and had asked about the one that Maurice would be in. The priest insisted on showing the Germans the room in question. Due to the instance of the priest, the Germans only took a peek inside the room instead of the more thorough verifications that had been done in other rooms.

In any event, I heard that Maurice died while providing cover to other allied soldiers. Another story I heard was that he did not die  but was wounded and captured. He would have been likely tortured for info and would have been executed as part of Hitler’s “Commando order”. However, I do not know if this is true, just what I have heard and read.

 

On a side note, both men were against the draft as they thought no-one should be forced to go to war. They were volunteers.

In any event, it is nice to see these young brave men remembered and honored. Me and my family truly appreciate this.

Have a wonderful day.

Best regards,

Daniel


Hi Pierre,

In any event, I attached a picture of Philippe with my mom and uncle. While there is no year for the picture, this I am told, may have been one of the last times that my mom would have seen her uncle. I have been told that this may have been taken shortly before Philippe’s final departure to Europe.

Last tid-bit;

My mom remembers waking up one morning to find her dad (Philippe’s older brother Jacques) crying. He was holding 2 letters, which would have been from the military. The 1st letter was the news that Philippe had been killed in combat. The 2nd letter stating that Maurice was missing and the worst was feared. My poor grandfather found out that he lost 2 brothers in a single day. It was one of the most striking moments of my mom’s life as my grandfather was not at all prone to publicly emoting.

Among my mom’s things are the silver “Airborne” division wings pin. This was one of my mom’s most precious belongings.

Again, thank you for your work 

Have a fantastic day.

Kindest regards,

Daniel