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I got this comment last week from Norm Gervais, but I did not have time to post something on the blog.


Mon père Jacques Gervais peut-être nommé comme James Gervais était je crois CPO lors de l’attaque. Il a dit très peu de choses lorsque il vivait au sujet de l’événement. Il doit sûrement sa vie au fait qu’il a été très sérieusement blessé et que à cause de ses blessure il a été placé dans un canot de sauvetage. Il paraitrait que plusieurs des marins non blessés ont dû s’accrocher au radeau parce qu’il n’y avait pas de place dans le canot. Certains de ceux-ci auraient été attaqué par des requins alors que d’autres seraient décédés à cause de l’eau froide. Mon père a été un de ceux qui n’a pas été fait prisonnier mais secouru par HMCS HAIDA.

Translation

My father Jacques Gervais, maybe going by the name James Gervais was I believe CPO (Chief Petty Officer) during the attack. He said very little about the event when he was living. He surely owed his life by the fact that he was very seriously injured, and because of this was put aboard a lifeboat. It would seem that several uninjured sailors had stayed in the water, and had to hold on to the lifeboat because there was not enough place. Some of them would have been attacked by sharks  while others died of hypothermia. My father was one of those not taken prisoner but rescued by HMCS HAIDA.


The name James Gervais or Jacques Gervais is not on the list found in the book Unlucky Lady.

This is the second time someone has written me about the list being incomplete.

The first time was in 2012 and I wrote about it.

Click here.

Norm wrote me a second time and he told me he thinks his father was working in the engine room… just like my wife’s uncle.

I got thinking…

Could Norm’s father be on these pictures taken early April 1944?

To be continued?

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For Canadian Aviation Enthusiast

Worth visiting…

https://canavbooks.wordpress.com/

Two news books…

Bagotville: 75 Years of Air Defence by Marc-Andre Valiquette

Here’s the info about Canada’s aviation blockbuster book for 2017. It’s a major effort – 512 pages, hardcover, some 1600 photos, 30 paintings and colour profiles – on and on, so no one will be disappointed in this outstanding production.

Marc-André has done his usual solid, in-depth coverage, assembling the exciting history of one of the great RCAF air stations. Also as usual, he has blended in both languages in his attractive and seamless layout. The book begins with WWII, with Bagotville training newbie fighter pilots on the Harvard and Hurricane. Many famous aces pass through on instructing tours, many students go on to stellar careers overseas. Next, comes the postwar era with Vampires, Sabres and CF-100s – all the historic squadrons, especially the all-weather CF-100 units – 440 and 432 form with CF-100 Mk.3s in 1953-54. Following, come steady developments – 440 goes overseas, 413 forms up, the CF-100 Mk.4 and 5 arrive, there’s a steady stream of air defence exercises, etc.

The CF-100 gives way to the CF-101 Voodoo era (410 and 425 squadrons), then the tactical world arrives with the CF-5 and the renowned 433 Squadron. Finally, the CF-18 Hornet years arrive for 425 Squadron. The evolution of Base Flight/439 Sqn is also included – from T-33 to Griffon helio. Many other aspects of life at “YBG” are included in this huge colour production, from DEW Line helicopter times to Air Cadets and airshows. So don’t think that my brief overview here begins to cover all the exciting content.

All things considered, Marc-André’s book is a bargain at the sticker price of $60.00 + $12.00 postage (Canada only, so USA and overseas please contact me for a shipping price) + tax $3.60 … Total in Canada $75.60 How to order? PayPal to larry@canavbooks.com, or post a cheque to CANAV Books, 51 Balsam Ave., Toronto ON M4E3B6.


Exile Air: World War II’s Little Norway in Toronto and Muskoka

Andrea Baston has spent years working on the history of this epic WWII story. Her wonderful history finally is in print.

To begin, Andrea provides an in-depth description of the 1940 Nazis invasion of Norway, and how Norway and the UK struggled valiantly to stave off disaster. Detailed coverage of the air war including RNoAF 1920s Fokkers and RAF biplane Gladiators putting up a strenuous defence.

Norway is overwhelmed, but the government, treasury, many citizens, etc. make it to the UK. By June 1940 arrangements are made to establish a Norwegian air training plan in Canada. “Little Norway” is established at Toronto Island Airport. Almost a hundred aircraft initially are assigned, Curtiss P-36 fighters included. Training officially begins in November. All the details are given, including the expected growing pains and how Little Norway dovetailed with the BCATP. Besides all the training, housing, contracts, administration, accidents, sports, social life in Toronto all are part of this outstanding new book – this is really an all-encompassing treatment. Then, Little Norway opens a new base in the Muskoka area to the north. Here, new pilots train on the Fairchild Cornell. Eventually, the Norwegian graduates end up manning RAF squadrons flying Spitfires, Catalinas, etc. All this also is carefully covered.

Many personal profiles (based on in-depth research and interviews) are part of the content and everything is described in detail to war’s end. The aftermath also is covered, including such important events as unveiling commemorative monuments and plaques in Toronto and Muskoka. This beautifully-produced, large format, 240-page softcover is one of the most important Canadian aviation stories in recent years. It includes many first-class photos, essential maps, notes, bibliography and index. An all-around beauty of an aviation book. $30.00 + $12.00 Canada Post + $2.10 tax = $ 44.10 (Canada). USA and overseas CDN$52.00. PayPal directly to larry@canavbooks.com, or post a cheque by snailmail to CANAV Books, 51 Balsam Ave., Toronto, Ontario M4E 3B6 Canada.


This is what got me interested…

http://canavbooks.com/publications/TyphoonAndTempest/

John Colton, another Typhoon pilot

Letters from the Past

Worth sharing

Our Ancestors

You should start reading them before you have too much to read…

https://worldwariiwordsmyuncle.blogspot.ca/

This is the introduction to the story.

https://worldwariiwordsmyuncle.blogspot.ca/2017_07_31_archive.html

My Uncle Charlie (Charles David Knight) was my mother’s brother. He served in World War II from 22 Dec 1942 – 14 Oct 1945. Born 14 Aug 1915 in Westbrook, Cumberland, Maine, USA; he was the oldest of five children in the Frank and Nina Knight household. He enlisted in the Army at the age of 27 hoping his younger brother, Eugene, would not be drafted. He did boot camp at Camp McCoy in Wisconsin and was deployed overseas beginning in Northern Ireland for 10 months training as part of Operation Overload, for the Normandy invasion. On June 7, 1944 (D Day +1) the division stormed Omaha Beach. His division liberated vital port city Brest on September 18, 1944 and seized Roer River Dam on December 11, 1944. His division…

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Someone’s uncle

Start here

https://worldwariiwordsmyuncle.blogspot.ca/2017_07_31_archive.html

This is what’s it’s all about…

My Uncle Charlie (Charles David Knight) was my mother’s brother. He served in World War II from 22 Dec 1942 – 14 Oct 1945. Born 14 Aug 1915 in Westbrook, Cumberland, Maine, USA; he was the oldest of five children in the Frank and Nina Knight household. He enlisted in the Army at the age of 27 hoping his younger brother, Eugene, would not be drafted. He did boot camp at Camp McCoy in Wisconsin and was deployed overseas beginning in Northern Ireland for 10 months training as part of Operation Overload, for the Normandy invasion. On June 7, 1944 (D Day +1) the division stormed Omaha Beach. His division liberated vital port city Brest on September 18, 1944 and seized Roer River Dam on December 11, 1944. His division held key roads leading to Liege and Antwerp during Battle of the Bulge. The last days of war his division spent moving across Czechoslovakia, and met Soviet allies in Pilsen.

While serving his country, he wrote over 200 letters to his parents and they were saved. I have the great opportunity to read these letters and share with my readers my uncle’s feeling, fears, hopes, and concerns of a soldier while serving his country overseas in World War II in the European Theater of the war. I will use information obtained from several sources to determine where my uncle’s battalion was likely located on the day he wrote the letter I will be sharing on the specific post in my blog. The blog is entitled “World War II in the Words of My Uncle.” He will become a Sergeant during the war.

 

May 3, 1915 The Red Poppy

May 3, 1915 The Red Poppy

Where the idea of the poppy came from…

Today in History

John McCrae was a physician and amateur poet from Guelph, Ontario. Following the outbreak of WWI, McCrae enlisted in the Canadian Expeditionary Force at the age of 41. He had the option of joining the medical corps based on his training and his age, but volunteered instead to join a fighting unit as gunner and medical officer. McCrae had previously served in the Boer War, this would be his second tour of duty in the Canadian military.

Red PoppyMcCrae fought in one of the most horrendous battles of WWI, the second battle of Ypres, in the Flanders region of Belgium. Imperial Germany launched one of the first chemical attacks in history, attacking the Canadian position with chlorine gas on April 22, 1915. The Canadian line was broken but quickly reformed, in near-constant fighting that lasted for over two weeks.

Dr. McCrae later wrote to his mother, describing the nightmare. “For seventeen…

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