Pilot Jack McIntosh – The last Canadian to bomb Peenemunde

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The challenges facing the young aircrew often seemed overwhelming, and they were highly vulnerable to physical and mental symptoms of stress. Two common denominators of stress was identified as showing up in the first five operations flown, combined with the matter-of-fact acceptance of sudden death. Jack faced this expression of his feelings toward a violent sudden death after his third operation, when two of his crew were killed in action, one wounded, and his aircraft was shot up, set on fire and he had to make a crash landing at base. The death of his two crew members was particularly hard on Jack as he knew it was inevitable, he would never live to complete his 30 operations or see Canada again. Jack was well aware of the consequences of being convicted of the Lack of Moral Fibre designation, issued in 1941, and employed against aircrew who could not fly for reasons considered unjustified. These airmen were grounded, stripped of all rank badges in front of all squadron members in a parade square ceremony. The Canadian was then dishonorably discharged and returned to Canada disgraced to all.

Lest We Forget

Pilot Jack McIntosh

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An homage written by Clarence Simonsen.

Excerpt

Pilot Jack McIntosh–The last Canadian to bomb Peenemunde

Medecine Hat 2

Jack became a friend of mine beginning in the fall 1986, while I was attempting to record the aircraft nose art used by No. 6 RCAF Group during WW II.He invited me to attend the up-coming Moose squadron reunion to be held at Camp Sarcee in July 1987, and I accepted. The reunion was held in a beautiful constructed log building, which was then an active Officer’s Mess for C.F.B. Calgary, on the leased land owned by the Sarcee Indian Reserve. The land had been used for a Canadian militia training base since the summer of 1910, and would remain until 21 June 1997.

While taking with Jack, he gazed out across the vast grass and tree covered ground and stated “This is where my military career all began.”

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