Not sure you are interested – Update

This comment  just in…

While surfing the net, my husband ran across this article and paintings and then showed them to me.  It was a lovely surprise since Luis Noriega Medrano was my dad. I showed the U-129 painting to my mother, who is now 98 and lives in Mexico City, and she thought it was very powerful. Gracias!

Not sure you are interested…

That’s what Clarence Simonsen wrote me when he sent me a 25-pages story.

Hello Pierre,

Hope you had a enjoyable holiday.
 
This is the history of the Mexican Air Force in WWII, which has been setting in my basement. Last winter it was updated and three new paintings completed in Mexico.
 
Use if you wish.  I will send the info. for paintings only if you want. This will require some editing.
 
Clarence

 

I said I was interested.

Hi Pierre,

This is the info. for the two paintings showing the first Mexican attack on a German U-boat. The other is the insignia of the Mexican 201st Fighter Squadron. In all three paintings I have incorporated the image of original Aztec art in the world famous museum in Mexico City. I have been there three times and it you ever get the chance, it is a must see. Just amazing displays. 
 
This is no use setting in my basement, so it might help out someone.
 
 
Clarence

DSC08209_crop
insignia of the Mexican 201st Fighter Squadron
DSC08204_crop
first Mexican attack on a German U-boat
DSC08200_crop
Now what about that 25-pages story?
I have to read it and enjoy it first.
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10 thoughts on “Not sure you are interested – Update

    1. Remember the Alamo.
      There was always animosity between Mexico and the U.S.
      U.S. expansionism in the 19th century led to this.
      This is why history is so important to learn the right way.
      Empires were built using native blood.
      Who really remembers how Christopher Columbus really was?

  1. Excerpt

    Bill Bigelow taught high school social studies in Portland, Ore. for almost 30 years. He is the curriculum editor of “Rethinking Schools” and the co-director of the Zinn Education Project. This project offers free materials to teach people’s history and an “If We Knew Our History” article series. Bigelow is author or co-editor of numerous books, including “A People’s History” for the Classroom and “The Line Between Us: Teaching About the Border and Mexican Immigration”.

    “For years, I opened my 11th-grade U.S. history classes by asking students, “What’s the name of that guy they say discovered America?” A few students might object to the word “discover,” but they all knew the fellow I was talking about, “Christopher Columbus!”, several called out in unison.

    “Right. So who did he find when he came here?” I asked. Usually, a few students would say, “Indians,” but I asked them to be specific: “Which nationality? What are their names?”

  2. Silence.

    In more than 30 years of teaching U.S. history and guest-teaching in others’ classes, I’ve never had a single student say, “Taínos.” So I ask them to think about that fact. “How do we explain that? We all know the name of the man who came here from Europe, but none of us knows the name of the people who were here first—and there were hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of them. Why haven’t you heard of them?”

    This ignorance is an artifact of historical silencing—rendering invisible the lives and stories of entire peoples. It’s what educators began addressing in earnest 20 years ago, during plans for the 500th anniversary of Columbus’s arrival in the Americas, which at the time the boasted would be “the most stupendous international celebration in the history of notable celebrations.” Native American and social justice activists, along with educators of conscience, pledged to interrupt the festivities.” The full story Rethinking Columbus: Towards a True People’s History

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