More info from Garry

I know you want to know more about what Garry told us about ships.

Garry wrote me another message.

Hi Pierre

The attached picture is of the Kootenay’s wheelhouse (post war Kootenay)

WHEELHOUSE KOOTENAY On the right of the picture you will see a engine room telegraph repeater. 

WHEELHOUSE KOOTENAY information 3You will see the brass wheel with the handle.  That is what they crank up or down to tell the engine room what revolutions to put the shafts at.

At the top of the picture you will see two voice pipes.  One goes to the bridge, one goes to the flag deck.

WHEELHOUSE KOOTENAY information 2 Also, above the voice pipe on the left, you will see what was called an Ika Box. 

WHEELHOUSE KOOTENAY information 1

This was for voice comms as well between bridge / flag deck and wheelhouse (as well as all other departments).

I’m not sure what was used most often as I saw both being used for comms.

Because the steamers has two shafts, which could operate independently, there were two telegraphs for the Ahead, Astern indication and two for the revolutions.

The reason for this is you could have the command, half ahead starboard and half astern port (or visa versa) … used for manoeuvring the ship off the jetty, and various other reasons I’m sure.

In order for this to happen quickly, you had a helmsman and the wheel and one guy at each set of repeaters.

Garry

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4 thoughts on “More info from Garry

  1. Garry’s photos of the wheelhouse bring back memories. Spent many hours at the helm onboard HMCS Skeena (DDH 207) ’69 -’72, HMCS Fraser (DDH 233), ’72 and HMCS Assiniboine (DDH 234) ’72 – ’76. These ships were hard to hold on course in stern seas and the wheelhouse was not a good place for a sailor prone to sea sickness. Fortunately I did not suffer from this malady after getting my sea legs.

    1. I hope you followed the guide and watch the You Tube video at the end by clicking on the link.
      There is a surprise there.

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