Lest We Forget 2012

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Most visited post… December 27, 2012

RCAF No. 403 Squadron

Just this...

Collection Walter Neil Dove

Just discovered this blog/site. Fantastic!

I am Arthur Van Rensselaer “Van” Sainsbury’s oldest son – some great stuff here.

Many thanks.

I told Greg that 2012 will be a great year…

Well that’s a good start…

As a starter, Michael sent me these…

Hank Zary
Royal Canadian Air Force Photograph
PL43537.

Padre Jackson at Aitch’s grave
Collection “Van” Sainsbury

Michael got more…

“Van” Sainsbury
Collection “Van” Sainsbury

Royal Canadian Air Force Photograph
PL42671

Royal Canadian Air Force Photograph
PL42673

Royal Canadian Air Force Photograph
PL45184
Royal Canadian Air Force Photograph
PL45180
Michael sent this last one…

Last one for today – my dad on the left…
Collection “Van” Sainsbury

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Lest we forget

The Chatter Blog

Husband and I left early. Our car loaded with gifts and food. On our way to his house I said “I bet you he says to wait and he will go upstairs and get his uniform”. The same uniform he has had for decades. The one he has earned the honor to wear. The uniform he treats with respect and care. I expected him to share it with us. Every time I took someone new to see him he would show it to the new person. Like he did with me on my first visit with him and his wife.

In the seat behind me was a stack of special gifts from around the world. Words of thanks and comfort, and well wishes for one of the men who stood between us and hell during World War II.

When I spoke with  him yesterday to arrange my visit he said…

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Words just can’t describe it.

Masako and Spam Musubi

It was a small yet precious family reunion. My 78 year old cousin Masako Kanemoto, who flew in from Hiroshima, took a bite out of a “Spam™ musubi” while we were taking a snack break in Kailua, Hawai’i. It’s a slice of Spam sandwiched in between some rice and wrapped in seaweed. “How mundane,” I thought.

Masako then beamed. “We had very little food for so many years. After the war, your father brought us food and clothing when he was in the US Army…” My dad was part of the US 8th Army’s Military Intelligence Service.

She continued, “He brought us much as he could carry. I was so hungry and I will always remember that first bite. I couldn’t believe how something could be so delicious.” She was referring to something my father had brought along with him 65 years ago – Spam.

Emotions tore through…

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Why Veterans Seldom Talk About the War?

“My father would wrinkle his nose at the mere sight of a flame thrower on tv.  He said, “Once you smell burning flesh, it stays with you.  There’s nothing worse.  Everytime I see one of those things flare up, even in a movie, I can smell the fuel and flesh all over again.”

My father did not tell me this. This blogger’s father did.

Who is this blogger?

This blogger has started a blog. Yesterday I read all her posts. I could not stop reading.

Curious?

Read the first one.

This is today’s post.

I have met several veterans since 2009 and wrote about them on my blogs. That’s why veterans seldom talk about the war.

“My father would wrinkle his nose at the mere sight of a flame thrower on tv.  He said, “Once you smell burning flesh, it stays with you.  There’s nothing worse.  Everytime I see one of those things flare up, even in a movie, I can smell the fuel and flesh all over again.”

Everett Smith’s scrapbook

Sharing knowledge

Pacific Paratrooper

  Everett A. Smith at Camp MacKall, NC

During my project of  transposing my father’s scrapbook into my computer to preserve it, my research into the 11th Airborne, the Pacific War and the state of the world during that era grabbed my interest.  I amassed a nice size manuscript with bibliography.  And I do not appear to be alone in this interest.

I discovered a multitude of forums and websites dedicated to that era and people searching frantically for any information on their relatives.

In the posts to follow I will include not just the photographs, information and portions of letters (if not all) from the scrapbook, but the political aspects of the past that brought the world to such an explosive state.  I will make every attempt to only post the facts.  Should I find that I wish to make my own opinions on a matter, I will state it as…

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