Who remembers Ernie?

Hello Pierre,

Attached are the pictures taken on December 31, 1941 (photographer, the CO, Harry DeWolfe) on board the St. Laurent.

photo 5

Back row,

Lto R, Sammie McDowell, Bill Arnold, Dick Wilson, Jack Ross and my father, Ralph Edwards.

Front Row,
Ernie Mills, the E.O. Jacques Piggott, and Keith Inglis.

The note Ernie sent to my dad on friendship, reads,

Links of Friendship
Form an Everlasting Chain
Of Happiness
So, Let not Ravages of
Time and Age
Make the Bond of Our
Link one bit Less

Year 1941-1942
Ernie Mills

photo 4

Who remembers Ernest Mills?

Ernest G. Mills

MPK – 29 Apr 1944

HMCS Athabaskan

Who remembers Ernest Mills?

Chief Engine Room Artifacer Ernest Mills,
Royal Canadian Navy
HMCS Athabaskan

Someone who had written this comment:

My dad, Captain (E) Ralph W. Edwards, aged 95, served on the old Sally with Ernie Mills, who was lost on the Athabascan. The other day he and I were going through some old photos and I came across one of the Sally’s ERA’s at a Christmas party in 1941, the picture of course including Ernie Mills, a very close friend of dad’s. Under the picture was a note written by Ernie to dad about friendship, and how important friends were to Ernie. I know this doesn’t directly relate to Athabascan, but would the photo and the note be of interest?

Who remembers Ernest Mills?

Who remembers Ernest Mills?

Ernest G. Mills

MPK – 29 Apr 1944

Click here.

 

Who remembers Ernest Mills?

Someone who wrote me this comment:

My dad, Captain (E) Ralph W. Edwards, aged 95, served on the old Sally with Ernie Mills, who was lost on the Athabascan. The other day he and I were going through some old photos and I came across one of the Sally’s ERA’s at a Christmas party in 1941, the picture of course including Ernie Mills, a very close friend of dad’s. Under the picture was a note written by Ernie to dad about friendship, and how important friends were to Ernie. I know this doesn’t directly relate to Athabascan, but would the photo and the note be of interest?

A bucket of shrimp

Pierre Lagacé:

A different kind of war stories

Originally posted on Fix Bayonets:

They say old folks do strange things. At least, I think that is what young people say about us when they talk about us at all —which isn’t all that often. I think this is because we old folks are a bother. I think this must explain why younger people want to place us in nursing homes.

In any case, this story unfolded every Friday evening, almost without fail, when the sun resembled a giant orange and was starting to dip into the wide blue ocean.

Seagull Feeding 001Old Ed came strolling along the beach to his favorite pier. Clutched in his bony hand was a bucket of shrimp. Ed walks out to the end of the pier, where it seems he almost has the world to himself. The glow of the sun is a golden bronze now. Everybody has gone, except for a few joggers on the beach. Standing out on…

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Cuban Missile Crisis

Pierre Lagacé:

About the Cuban crisis…

Originally posted on pacificparatrooper:

Missile launch sites in Cuba

Missile launch sites in Cuba

16 October is the 52nd anniversary of the start of the Cuban Missile Crisis.  For 13 days –  I felt I was holding my breath.  My uncle, MSgt. James O’Leary, already stationed on Cuba was flown back to the island from his leave; my cousin, Arthur Mulroy set sail from Norfolk, VA; and my aunt, Mabel O’Leary, a civilian employee of the Marines, were at stake here.

missiles involved

missiles involved

EVENTS –

- A U-2 spy-plane took pictures of missile bases in Cuba – Pres. Kennedy is notified that within 10 days, they will be operational.
- Kennedy set up a Committee of the National Security Council to advise him.  Their options: (1) Nuclear Strike? would probably cause a nuclear war; (2) Conventional Attack? Would probably cause war with Russia; (3) Use the UN? Too slow; (4) The bases were too close to ignore; (5) Blockade?…

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RAF and the Cuban Missile Crisis

Pierre Lagacé:

About the Cuban crisis…

Originally posted on Defence of the Realm:

CastroVbomber

Today (16th October 2014) marks the 52nd anniversary of what is considered to be the start of the Cuban Missile Crisis; arguably the closest time in history that the world stood on the brink of nuclear Armageddon. The truth is however that there have been numerous occasions since then that actually brought us closer and I will be covering those incidents in a future article. The Cuban Missile Crisis however is the most famous of these incidents because it was certainly the most prolonged and most publicised incident. While all the glory falls on the US and in particular President John F. Kennedy it is only part of the story that involved a multi national response to the tense situation that was playing out in the Caribbean. To the US, one of the most key allies in the world was the UK.

c06_01474139

Looking back the Cuban Missile Crisis (or indeed…

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A day in the life of Eddy Dubois – How I connected with Eddy…

Post 688

I hope you have clicked on the image last Monday.

Martin Baltimore

Eddy Dubois

If not, there is always time to do so…

Everyone who went to war to serve his country is a hero in my book even if I never wrote a book in my life.

I wrote what follows in 2011…

Eddy was a hero, just like his brother Larry who died on…

December 18, 1944

Eddy is on the left on his way to Bermuda.

This is the original picture Eddy sent before I made some minor modifications to it.


Eddy had written this caption…

Me on way to Bermuda from Elizabeth City, North Carolina in a Catalina flying boat in the bubble at rear

Eddy died on December 24, 2010 and rejoigned his brother Larry.

He shared a lot of pictures he had about his wartime service in the Ferry Command.


I never got around to ask him permission to share these pictures with my readers but I know he would have given it.

These pictures are precious mementos. Click on each to zoom in.

Eddy was stationed in Bermuda in 1942 and 1943.

Darrell’s Island Bermuda our base


Eddy had this caption…

Darrell’s Island

This was our base.
Flying over I took a picture of it and the Pan AM, BOAC BASE, from the Coronado flying boat which was piloted by Wing Commander Mo Ware, OBE. DFC. on a test flight. Only 1 PBM at anchor and one on the ramp. We were flying in CORONADO JX 740 (which was a 4 motor flying boat, our first one) (Received on Apr. 4th, 1943). This was a training and test flight. They were new to us. They had to have 40 hours test flight and inspections done in Bermuda and it was used for local training for a while as well. It departed for Halifax (Dartmouth) on April 16th, 1943) and from there to Gander Lake, Iceland and Scotland or Gibraltar. These were used for transport of goods and passenger were unarmed.
Eddy had this picture also…

PBM Mariner

Eddy had this to say about that picture…

One of many that was ferried to Prestwick Scotland during 1943.

He also added this…

One like this sank off this island, one airman drowned (failed to inflate life jacket). I rescued him too late.

I will post more of Eddy’s pictures next week since these kind of pictures are very rare.

There are only a few like this one that can be could found on the Internet…

Photograph from Wing Commander Mo Ware, Commanding Officer of RAF forces in Bermuda during the War

To learn more about Bermuda during the war, click here

Footnote

December 18, 1944

October 12, 1944

Pierre Lagacé:

I am impressed by all the research. I know I might have said this before about this blog, but I am impressed even more when I read this post.

Originally posted on Wayne's Journal:

Thursday

The past fifteen days have gone like wildfire.

Russell was evacuated to Finschafen for hospitalization, and I went to Sydney, Australia on my rest leave of six days. Spent most of the time wandering around the town and doing some drinking. A lot of drinking, I should say. Stayed at Mom and Pops (Mr. & Mrs. Zuckerman’s at 52 Beach Road in Bondi, Sydney N.S.W., Australia.) It was just like going home.1 They were so very good to us. In turn, we gave them candy which Aussie civilians can’t get and flowers.

The trip was unforgettable but not much good on the nerves. A 6,000 mile round trip. We were just over the first half of the journey when we turned around and came back. Rest leaves cut to six days so all men can have one. Took 8 months to get the first one. Hope the next…

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